Customer Centric OPS customer service image

The lines between conventional manufacturing, warehousing, distribution, wholesaling, and retailing have been profoundly blurred as a result of an insatiable demand for "value" (a balance of cost, time, and quality).

In an effort to add value, practices such as postponement and mass-customization caused warehouse designs to include work-in-process (WIP) activities that were previously performed in the manufacturing environment. Conversely, the warehouse has become home to value-added services (VAS) such as price-ticketing and theft-tagging that traditionally would have been performed in the retail workspace. Because the warehouse is the integral link between supplier and customer, its role will continue to expand both up and down the supply chain in an effort to optimize supply chain effectiveness and as a result, increase value.

Stringent performance mandates (and associated non-compliance charges) imposed by mass-merchants are accelerating this operational metamorphosis, creating an opportunity for forward-thinking companies to capitalize on change. Those who do not may find themselves too far behind to effectively compete.

WE MUST VIEW THE WAREHOUSE AS A “CUSTOMER SERVICE CENTER”

For if we do not, the delta between our current value proposition and that which is possible is the weapon with which a savvy competitor will defeat us. Tactical superiority cannot be achieved without an unfailing focus on customer service.

Marketing departments promise specific service levels to customers as part of the sales process. It is our goal to support sales and marketing by allowing them to establish a strategic service level and “PROMISE WITH CONFIDENCE.”™

Operations departments must execute based on these promises. It is our goal to support operations by engineering systems, procedures, and infrastructure that allow them to fulfill the promise and “DELIVER WITH PRECISION.”™

Warehousing, distribution, and fulfillment operations are the critical links between the promise made by sales and marketing and the customer. Warehouse design initiatives must be based on this principle in order to be successful.